Home » Grandmothers Child by Annie S Swan
Grandmothers Child Annie S Swan

Grandmothers Child

Annie S Swan

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230464565
Paperback
26 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1882 edition. Excerpt: ... Some tramps kid,MoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1882 edition. Excerpt: ... Some tramps kid, likely, the woman thought, but she could not get the childs face out of her mind. The little traveller, clutching her box and her kitten, and her provisions all in her arms, almost ran out of the town, so afraid was she of being overtaken and detained. She grew tired by-and-by, for she had walked seven miles that day--a long way for little limbs, and it grew so intensely dark, she feared she might lose her way. There was a tall hedge on either side of the road, and a tree every few hundred yards. If she could get inside the hedge, the child thought, she could nestle down at the root of one of the trees, and find shelter till the morning. Peering closely at the hedge, she came to a gap large enough to let her through- and a few yards from the gap there was a great tree, with a thick trunk and great branches spreading out round and round it. They were quite leafless to be sure, but so thick that they were a shelter from the wind. The kitten began to mew piteously for her supper, for which its little mistress reproved it mildly. You would have smiled to see the child take a bite of bread and a mouthful of milk, and then pour a little into her hand to feed the kitten. You might have smiled, but a tear would not have been very far away. Now, Kitty, she said, talking to the little thing as if it were a human being, we must keep this till morning, you know, because I dunno when well get any more. Forty miles yet, Kitty- the last one I asked said it was forty-five, so were gettin on, Kitty, an when we get to grandmothers youll get ever so big a basin o the thick cream mother used to. Her voice broke, and catching the kitten in her arms, and bending her face close over it, the child sobbed herself to sleep. It...